DokuMontag: My Buddha is Punk

06.03.2017 | My Buddha is Punk is the second full-length documentary film from director Andreas Hartmann, who in 2012/2013 lived in Myanmar on a DAAD scholarship where he encountered the protagonist of his film. Kyaw Kyaw is a 25-year-old Burmese punk who dreams of seeing the punk movement take off in Myanmar. Together with members of his punk band he tries to raise awareness of persistent human rights abuses. Via his music and demonstrations on the street he criticises the ongoing civil war and the persecution of ethnic minorities. He travels across the country to spread his own philosophy amongst the younger generations; a symbiosis of Buddhism and punk that rejects religious dictates and political doctrine. “My Buddha is Punk is a fascinating portrait of a rebellious youth culture in the midst of a restrictive, conservative and deeply religious society” was the judgement of the Festival Achtung Berlin – New Berlin Film Award which featured the film in its programme last year. The film premiered at the 56th Festival dei Popoli in Florence.

Andreas Hartmann was born in Paderborn in 1983, he lives in Berlin and works as a filmmaker and camera man. He graduated from with a Diplom in cinematography from the Film University Babelsberg KONRAD WOLF. He is the recipient of several DAAD scholarships and in 2014 was the Goethe Insitut’s artist in residence at the Villa Kamogawa in Kyoto, Japan. Works showcasing his directing and cinematography have been shown at international film festivals in Paris, Toronto, Munich, Warsaw, São Paulo, Berlin and Florence amongst others.

A EUNIC event by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and the Tschechisches Zentrum Berlin.

My Buddha is Punk | Director: Andreas Hartmann | Germany, Myanmar 2015, 68 mins, original with subtitles.
Tschechisches Zentrum | March 6th, 7pm | Wilhelmstr. 44, entrance Mohrenstraße, 10117 Berlin | http://berlin.czechcentres.cz  | Free entrance

The DokuMontag film series at the Tschechisches Zentrum screens documentary films twice a month, which explore social and human rights issues.